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Suchet Daniel
PROFESSEUR ASSISTANT

Contact

Bureau : !IPVF
Département/Laboratoire/Service : CA/DER/DEP/PHYS
Fonctions complémentaires :
COLLABORATEUR SCIENTIFIQUE

Bibliographie & travail en cours

Biographie: 

Enseignant-chercheur au département de physique et à l'Institut du Photovoltaïque d'Ile de France (IPVF).

Avant ça, ingénieur de l'Ecole polytechnique (X2008), Master Physique Quantique de l'Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris, Thèse au Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, JSPS Fellowship au RCAST (Université de Tokyo), postdoc ANR Industrial Chair au Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces (Ecole polytechnique).

Membre du comité éxécutif du Tournoi International des Physiciens (IPT), éditeur en chef du journal pédagogique Emergent Scientist, membre de la commission Jeune de la Société Française de Physique.

Médiation scientifique : conférences grand public ("Comment parler de Science avec de la Fiction ?", "Energie et société"), Ambassadeur de la Fête de la Science pour la région Île de France (2018)

Enseignement: 

PHY 205 Intoduction to quantum mechanics

PHY 208 Atoms and Lasers

PHY 530 Refresher in Physics (a 16h update on basic quantum mechanics and semiconductor physics for photovoltaics)

PHY 558B Photovoltaics

PSC : International Physicists' Tournament, Quantum mechanics

Programme ATHENS : introduction au photovoltaique

Recherche: 

Caractérisation optique de matériaux photovoltaïques

Nouveaux concepts pour la conversion d'énergie

Publications et Liens

Publications: 

 

Publications HAL: 
FALSE

Hal

Publications HAL: 

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Enseignement: 

Cours :

PHY205 - Introduction to Quantum Physics (2019-2020)

Quantum physics is the theoretical framework for the description of nature at the atomic length scale and below. According to our present knowledge, it encompasses the most fundamental physical theory, and is the basis for everyday applications like semi-conductor electrons, lasers, medical imaging to name only a few. In PHY 205, students discover quantum physics through the formalism of Schrödinger’s wave mechanics, and learn to describe simple, non-relativistic quantum phenomena, mainly in one dimension, by applying mathematics of classical waves to which they have become familiar. Subsequently, they are introduced to the quantum-mechanical formalism of which the central notion is the quantum state. Students also become familiar with the underlying mathematical structures, Hilbert spaces and Hermitian operators, and discover the quantum description of known classical systems and concepts such as free motion, the harmonic oscillator and angular momentum. The course also allows students to explore purely quantum phenomena that have no classical counterpart, such as the electron spin, and a brief overview on quantum communication may be provided. Throughout the course, the abstract theory will be illustrated by historic experimental evidence and modern applications whenever appropriate.

 Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the conceptual difference between classical and quantum behavior, and solve simple one- or two-dimensional problems of quantum mechanics in the framework of wave mechanics. Furthermore, they will be able to wield the abstract formalism of quantum states in Hilbert spaces, and to apply it on simple quantum systems.

PHY208 - Atoms and Lasers (2019-2020)

Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) holds a unique place in the heart of physicists. Lasers are at the same time a spectacular manifestation of a quantum phenomenon, a powerful and versatile tool ranging from industrial applications (laser processing, telemetry...) to fundamental research (spectroscopy, cold atoms,...) and a remarkable workbench to acquire a better understanding of key concepts in physics.

 

PHY208 is an introduction to light-matter interactions through the intricate relationship between atoms and lasers. Importantly, this course will build on experimental situations, and introduce models with increasing complexity to explain the observed results. As the basic component of a laser is a source of light, the course will start with basic spectroscopy, and several atomic models will be considered (Bohr model, Einstein coefficients, Schrodinger model, etc.). The emission of continuous laser light by such atoms will be described from both a classical (effective medium) and semi-classical (population inversion) perspective. The mirror will then be turned back on the atoms, and several applications of laser light revealing the behavior of atoms will be discussed (Light, Stark and Zeeman shift, Rabi oscillations etc.). Finally, some practical perspectives on advanced laser technologies and applications will be given.

 

This course will not add many new physical concepts, but rather show how results obtained in previous courses (especially in optics, classical and quantum mechanics) can be used. Upon completion of this course, students will have acquired key understandings concerning the bilateral interactions between laser devices and atoms. They will have understood the circumstances under which the emission of useful coherent light can be produced, and also the information that such light can provide when analyzing atomic systems. They will also be able to identify the relevance, necessity, and limitations that classical and quantum models display when analyzing problems in this field. They will also gain familiarity with some laser device technologies.

PHY530 - Refresher Course in Physics (2019-2020)

PHY630 - Physics Refresher Course (2019-2020)

PHY/MEC471 - MODAL - Tournoi international de Physique (IPT) (2019-2020)

Groupe de Travail Pédagogie

PHY657 - Modeling the energy and climate transitions (2019-2020)

Modeling the energy and climate transitions

PHY 657

 

J.-F. Guillemoles

&  D. Suchet

 

A-   Summary

Production and energy management systems are presently undergoing profound changes. An ever larger number of decisions are based on models and simulations, and especially models with a physical basis. This is often seen in particular in the context of the energy and climate transitions: energy systems models help to improve design and get better performances, better and more competitive fabrication processes, longer lifetimes, better informed investment decisions (in terms of how much energy could ultimately be expected), climate models help understand complex interaction between human activity and environment, scenarios for social transitions help steer political decisions. The models are used to improve our understanding of energy systems by their description (simulation) or by providing tentative explanations, based on our knowledge of physical laws and of the dynamics of the system, they are also expected to deliver some level of prediction, on which decisions could be based. Unfortunately, while the output and conclusions of the models are often readily used and debated, the methodology and the validity of hypothesis and results are not often enough closely scrutinized.

All these models describe complex situations. They can also be ill-used, challenged, or even rebutted. In this context it is essential to understand how these models are built, and how reliable they are. Physics is the science that arguably gave the most accurate models available. It is very powerful in terms of analyzing the key components of an evolving system.

 The educational objective of the course is to show how to use physicist’s tools of the trade to answer the upcoming challenges on energy and climate change: how to build a model in the energy and climate change contexts? How can the key elements be selected? How is it validated? How is its reliability explored? How are uncertainty and incomplete data dealt with?

This is not a course in applied mathematics: efficient programming is important, as is a careful choice of algorithms, but this comes after the general framework is chosen and the direction set.  Nor is it a course on big data analysis. An efficient algorithm can produce irrelevant or wrong data, and using up to date data analysis tool will not help to produce sensible conclusions. This course will focus on reliable and relevant model production.

 The first 3 lectures will provide general methodological basis. Following courses, that will include presentations by experts of the fields covered, will dig into prominent cases of application.  Participants will complete their training through a case study that will be proposed to them. This work will be guided, and will include a report followed by a discussion for the final examination.

 

 

B-   Proposed Planning

 

Course Content

Classes

 

when 

1

Principles of modeling, model classes, methodology

Exemples

 

 

2

Analysis and model building, dimensional analysis, dimensional reduction

Building a model

 

 

3

Model validation and sensitivity analysis, model calibration

Checking a model

 

 

4

Modeling production processes, dissipation functions

Guided Case study

 

 

5

Modeling materials for energy : simulations and materials by design, micro to macro.

Guided Case study

 

 

6

Modeling energy output (productible)

Guided Case study

 

 

7

Modeling flows on planet earth

Guided Case study

 

 

8

Climate modeling and uncertainties

Guided Case study

 

 

9

Scenario modeling and decision making

Guided Case study

 

 

10

Examinations

 

 

 

 

PHY555 - Energy and Environment (2019-2020)

Bilingual Course

The general topic of energy, both at French and worldwide levels, represents some considerable challenge in this beginning of the twenty-first century. We should take up in the next few years a significant number of challenges including the depletion of fossil resources or the consequences of global warming. Understanding concepts related to energy, its most fundamental aspects in its various forms and many uses, becomes essential in the formation of an engineer. The impact on the environment, climate change, the reasonable use of fossil fuels and alternative solutions must be at the heart of its concerns.

This course is largely a about physics and applications. However, it introduces and develops numerous multidisciplinary concepts related to energy such as economy or environment. It will represent an introductory course for students who are considering to study in Masters for careers related to the problems of energy and sustainable development. It will give to other students some comprehensive and rigorous overview of problems, essential to understand our society and its issues.

The course consists of approximately three parts

  1. The energy and its use

Historical context and definitions. First and second principles.
Orders of magnitude and fundamental interactions.
The different forms of energy. Primary and secondary Energy. Efficiencies.
Resource depletions. The peak oil discoveries.
The French and worldwide context.
The climatic consequences. The mechanism of the greenhouse effect.
CO2 emissions and international agreements.

   2.Renewable energy

Different solutions: hydro power, wind power, solar, biomass and others.
Comparison of different type of primary energy in the production of electricity.
Hydrogen as energy vector for the future. The general problem of transport.
The technical, environmental and economic issues.
The recent improvement for the use of fossil fuels.
CO2 storage and other research topics.

  3. Nuclear Energy

Principle of current reactors. The future generation 4.
The fuel cycle and resource depletion.
Problems and solution of waste storage.
The prospects of fusion for the production of electricity
The Tchernobyl, Fukushima and Three Mile Island accidents.

Credits ECTS : 5




Bilingual Course

The general topic of energy, both at French and worldwide levels, represents some considerable challenge in this beginning of the twenty-first century. We should take up in the next few years a significant number of challenges including the depletion of fossil resources or the consequences of global warming. Understanding concepts related to energy, its most fundamental aspects in its various forms and many uses, becomes essential in the formation of an engineer. The impact on the environment, climate change, the reasonable use of fossil fuels and alternative solutions must be at the heart of its concerns.

This course is largely a about physics and applications. However, it introduces and develops numerous multidisciplinary concepts related to energy such as economy or environment. It will represent an introductory course for students who are considering to study in Masters for careers related to the problems of energy and sustainable development. It will give to other students some comprehensive and rigorous overview of problems, essential to understand our society and its issues.

The course consists of approximately three parts

  1. The energy and its use

Historical context and definitions. First and second principles.
Orders of magnitude and fundamental interactions.
The different forms of energy. Primary and secondary Energy. Efficiencies.
Resource depletions. The peak oil discoveries.
The French and worldwide context.
The climatic consequences. The mechanism of the greenhouse effect.
CO2 emissions and international agreements.

   2.Renewable energy

Different solutions: hydro power, wind power, solar, biomass and others.
Comparison of different type of primary energy in the production of electricity.
Hydrogen as energy vector for the future. The general problem of transport.
The technical, environmental and economic issues.
The recent improvement for the use of fossil fuels.
CO2 storage and other research topics.

  3. Nuclear Energy

Principle of current reactors. The future generation 4.
The fuel cycle and resource depletion.
Problems and solution of waste storage.
The prospects of fusion for the production of electricity
The Tchernobyl, Fukushima and Three Mile Island accidents.

Credits ECTS : 5

Ressources pédagogiques

Plan de continuité d'activité d'enseignement

GEN361 - Espace départements (2019-2020)

PSC411 - Projet Scientifique collectif (2019-2020)

PHY/MEC471 - MODAL - Tournoi international de Physique (IPT) (2020-2021)

PHY530 - Refresher Course in Physics (2020-2021)

PHY558B - Physics and Engineering of Photovoltaic Devices (2020-2021)

Course Outline:

  • General Introduction, “What is Photovoltaics?” Solar energy resource, current use of PV
  • Introduction to the physics of crystalline semiconductors: band structure, intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors, quasi-Fermi levels.
  • Transport phenomena in semiconductors, recombination, the p-n junction. The photovoltaic effect
  • Material junctions and energy band-diagrams. Metal/semiconductor contacts. Heterojunctions
  • Optical absorption, solar spectrum and EQE. Solar cell efficiency limits. Equivalent circuit model.
  • Crystalline silicon (c-Si) PV technology and operation. Basic and high efficiency c-Si cell architectures.
  • PV technology overview and the cost of PV
  • Modules, concentration, and advanced concepts

 


Niveau requis :
Recommended courses for Ecole polytechnique's students :
PHY430 - Advanced Quantum Physics  and  PHY433 - Statistical Physics

Langue du cours : English

Credits ECTS : 5




Course Outline:

  • General Introduction, “What is Photovoltaics?” Solar energy resource, current use of PV
  • Introduction to the physics of crystalline semiconductors: band structure, intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors, quasi-Fermi levels.
  • Transport phenomena in semiconductors, recombination, the p-n junction. The photovoltaic effect
  • Material junctions and energy band-diagrams. Metal/semiconductor contacts. Heterojunctions
  • Optical absorption, solar spectrum and EQE. Solar cell efficiency limits. Equivalent circuit model.
  • Crystalline silicon (c-Si) PV technology and operation. Basic and high efficiency c-Si cell architectures.
  • PV technology overview and the cost of PV
  • Modules, concentration, and advanced concepts

 

Niveau requis : 

Recommended courses for Ecole polytechnique students :
PHY430 - Advanced Quantum Physics  and  PHY433 - Statistical Physics

Course Language : English

ECTS Credits : 5

Renewable energies S2020/2021

PHY205 - Introduction to Quantum Physics (2020-2021)

Quantum physics is the theoretical framework
for the description of nature at
the atomic length scale and below. According
to our present knowledge, it encompasses
the most fundamental physical
theory, and is the basis for everyday applications
like semi-conductor electrons,
lasers, medical imaging to name only a
few. In PHY205, students discover quantum
physics through the formalism of
Schrödinger’s wave mechanics, and learn
to describe simple, non-relativistic quantum
phenomena, mainly in one dimension,
by applying mathematics of classical
waves to which they have become familiar.
Subsequently, they are introduced to
the quantum-mechanical formalism of
which the central notion is the quantum
state. Students also become familiar with
the underlying mathematical structures,
Hilbert spaces and Hermitian operators,
and discover the quantum description
of known classical systems and concepts
such as free motion, the harmonic oscillator
and angular momentum. The course
also allows students to explore purely
quantum phenomena that have no classical
counterpart, such as the electron
spin, and a brief overview on quantum
communication may be provided. Throughout
the course, the abstract theory will
be illustrated by historic experimental
evidence and modern applications whenever
appropriate.
Upon completion of this course, students
will be able to explain the conceptual
difference between classical and quantum
behavior, and solve simple one- or
two-dimensional problems of quantum
mechanics in the framework of wave
mechanics. Furthermore, they will be
able to wield the abstract formalism of
quantum states in Hilbert spaces, and to
apply it on simple quantum systems.




Quantum physics is the theoretical framework for the description of nature at the atomic length scale and below. According to our present knowledge, it encompasses the most fundamental physical theory, and is the basis for everyday applications like semi-conductor electrons, lasers, medical imaging to name only a few. In PHY 205, students discover quantum physics through the formalism of Schrödinger’s wave mechanics, and learn to describe simple, non-relativistic quantum phenomena, mainly in one dimension, by applying mathematics of classical waves to which they have become familiar. Subsequently, they are introduced to the quantum-mechanical formalism of which the central notion is the quantum state. Students also become familiar with the underlying mathematical structures, Hilbert spaces and Hermitian operators, and discover the quantum description of known classical systems and concepts such as free motion, the harmonic oscillator and angular momentum. The course also allows students to explore purely quantum phenomena that have no classical counterpart, such as the electron spin, and a brief overview on quantum communication may be provided. Throughout the course, the abstract theory will be illustrated by historic experimental evidence and modern applications whenever appropriate.

 Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the conceptual difference between classical and quantum behavior, and solve simple one- or two-dimensional problems of quantum mechanics in the framework of wave mechanics. Furthermore, they will be able to wield the abstract formalism of quantum states in Hilbert spaces, and to apply it on simple quantum systems.

PHY208 - Atoms and Lasers (2020-2021)

Light amplification by stimulated emission
of radiation (laser) holds a unique
place in the heart of physicists. Lasers
are at the same time a spectacular manifestation
of a quantum phenomenon, a
powerful and versatile tool ranging from
industrial applications (laser processing,
telemetry…) to fundamental research
(spectroscopy, cold atoms…) and a
remarkable workbench to acquire a better
understanding of key concepts in physics.
PHY 208 is an introduction to lightmatter
interactions through the intricate
relationship between atoms and lasers.
Importantly, this course will build on
experimental situations, and introduce
models with increasing complexity to
explain the observed results. As the basic
component of a laser is a source of light,
the course will start with basic spectroscopy,
and several atomic models will be
considered (Bohr model, Einstein coefficients,
Schrodinger model, etc.). The
emission of continuous laser light by
such atoms will be described from both
a classical (effective medium) and semiclassical
(population inversion) perspective.
The mirror will then be turned back
on the atoms, and several applications of
laser light revealing the behavior of atoms
will be discussed (Light, Stark and Zeeman
shift, Rabi oscillations etc.). Finally,
some practical perspectives on advanced
laser technologies and applications will be
given.
This course will not add many new physical
concepts, but rather show how results
obtained in previous courses (especially
in optics, classical and quantum mechanics)
can be used. Upon completion of
this course, students will have acquired
key understandings concerning the bilateral
interactions between laser devices
and atoms. They will have understood the
circumstances under which the emission
of useful coherent light can be produced,
and also the information that such light
can provide when analyzing atomic systems.
They will also be able to identify the
relevance, necessity, and limitations that
classical and quantum models display
when analyzing problems in this field.
They will also gain familiarity with some
laser device technologies.




Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) holds a unique place in the heart of physicists. Lasers are at the same time a spectacular manifestation of a quantum phenomenon, a powerful and versatile tool ranging from industrial applications (laser processing, telemetry...) to fundamental research (spectroscopy, cold atoms,...) and a remarkable workbench to acquire a better understanding of key concepts in physics.

 

PHY208 is an introduction to light-matter interactions through the intricate relationship between atoms and lasers. Importantly, this course will build on experimental situations, and introduce models with increasing complexity to explain the observed results. As the basic component of a laser is a source of light, the course will start with basic spectroscopy, and several atomic models will be considered (Bohr model, Einstein coefficients, Schrodinger model, etc.). The emission of continuous laser light by such atoms will be described from both a classical (effective medium) and semi-classical (population inversion) perspective. The mirror will then be turned back on the atoms, and several applications of laser light revealing the behavior of atoms will be discussed (Light, Stark and Zeeman shift, Rabi oscillations etc.). Finally, some practical perspectives on advanced laser technologies and applications will be given.

 

This course will not add many new physical concepts, but rather show how results obtained in previous courses (especially in optics, classical and quantum mechanics) can be used. Upon completion of this course, students will have acquired key understandings concerning the bilateral interactions between laser devices and atoms. They will have understood the circumstances under which the emission of useful coherent light can be produced, and also the information that such light can provide when analyzing atomic systems. They will also be able to identify the relevance, necessity, and limitations that classical and quantum models display when analyzing problems in this field. They will also gain familiarity with some laser device technologies.

CoursPHY555 - Energy and Environment (2020-2021)

Bilingual Course

The general topic of energy, both at French and worldwide levels, represents some considerable challenge in this beginning of the twenty-first century. We should take up in the next few years a significant number of challenges including the depletion of fossil resources or the consequences of global warming. Understanding concepts related to energy, its most fundamental aspects in its various forms and many uses, becomes essential in the formation of an engineer. The impact on the environment, climate change, the reasonable use of fossil fuels and alternative solutions must be at the heart of its concerns.

This course is largely a about physics and applications. However, it introduces and develops numerous multidisciplinary concepts related to energy such as economy or environment. It will represent an introductory course for students who are considering to study in Masters for careers related to the problems of energy and sustainable development. It will give to other students some comprehensive and rigorous overview of problems, essential to understand our society and its issues.

The course consists of approximately three parts

  1. The energy and its use

Historical context and definitions. First and second principles.
Orders of magnitude and fundamental interactions.
The different forms of energy. Primary and secondary Energy. Efficiencies.
Resource depletions. The peak oil discoveries.
The French and worldwide context.
The climatic consequences. The mechanism of the greenhouse effect.
CO2 emissions and international agreements.

   2.Renewable energy

Different solutions: hydro power, wind power, solar, biomass and others.
Comparison of different type of primary energy in the production of electricity.
Hydrogen as energy vector for the future. The general problem of transport.
The technical, environmental and economic issues.
The recent improvement for the use of fossil fuels.
CO2 storage and other research topics.

  3. Nuclear Energy

Principle of current reactors. The future generation 4.
The fuel cycle and resource depletion.
Problems and solution of waste storage.
The prospects of fusion for the production of electricity
The Tchernobyl, Fukushima and Three Mile Island accidents.

Credits ECTS : 5




Bilingual Course

The general topic of energy, both at French and worldwide levels, represents some considerable challenge in this beginning of the twenty-first century. We should take up in the next few years a significant number of challenges including the depletion of fossil resources or the consequences of global warming. Understanding concepts related to energy, its most fundamental aspects in its various forms and many uses, becomes essential in the formation of an engineer. The impact on the environment, climate change, the reasonable use of fossil fuels and alternative solutions must be at the heart of its concerns.

This course is largely a about physics and applications. However, it introduces and develops numerous multidisciplinary concepts related to energy such as economy or environment. It will represent an introductory course for students who are considering to study in Masters for careers related to the problems of energy and sustainable development. It will give to other students some comprehensive and rigorous overview of problems, essential to understand our society and its issues.

The course consists of approximately three parts

  1. The energy and its use

Historical context and definitions. First and second principles.
Orders of magnitude and fundamental interactions.
The different forms of energy. Primary and secondary Energy. Efficiencies.
Resource depletions. The peak oil discoveries.
The French and worldwide context.
The climatic consequences. The mechanism of the greenhouse effect.
CO2 emissions and international agreements.

   2.Renewable energy

Different solutions: hydro power, wind power, solar, biomass and others.
Comparison of different type of primary energy in the production of electricity.
Hydrogen as energy vector for the future. The general problem of transport.
The technical, environmental and economic issues.
The recent improvement for the use of fossil fuels.
CO2 storage and other research topics.

  3. Nuclear Energy

Principle of current reactors. The future generation 4.
The fuel cycle and resource depletion.
Problems and solution of waste storage.
The prospects of fusion for the production of electricity
The Tchernobyl, Fukushima and Three Mile Island accidents.

Credits ECTS : 5

CoursPHY657 - Building and Using Models for the Energy Transition (2020-2021)

Models are everywhere, and especially when it comes to the energy and climate transitions. They provide a rationale for decision making, and constitute the standard way to test and improve our understanding. Yet, what a “model” is can be very different from one actor to another. Furthermore, models should be used with methodological care: any model is developed to address specific questions, in a specific validity range, with specific assumptions. However, while the output and conclusions of the models are often readily used and debated, the methodology and the validity of hypothesis and results are not often enough closely scrutinized.


As scientists involved in the energy and climate transitions, you will have to deal with many different models – whether you developed them yourselves or simply use their results. The aim of this course is to provide you with a critical methodology based on a physicist’s toolbox to help you use these models as wisely as possible.

As a note of caution : this is not a course in applied mathematics : efficient programming is important, as is a careful choice of algorithms, but this comes after the general framework is chosen and the direction set.  Nor is it a course on big data analysis. An efficient algorithm can produce irrelevant or wrong data, and using up to date data analysis tool will not help to produce sensible conclusions.

The first lectures will introduce basic concepts of modelling (modeling vs simulation, prediction vs prospection…) as well as a set of physics methods relevant to the field (perturbative approach, scaling laws...). Following lectures will be presented by experts in the transition sector who will share their own experience of modelling. Students will select a case study they will investigate throughout the course, building their own model to compare and test against the existing literature.

GEN350 - GEN350 - Séminaire Développement Durable (2020-2021)

GEN400 - GEN400 - Amphis de Présentation (2020-2021)

PAN3A-P1 - Cours panaché P1 (2021-2022)

PAN3A-P2 - Cours panaché P2 (2021-2022)

PHY/MEC471 - MODAL - Tournoi international de Physique (IPT) (2021-2022)

GEN370 - GEN370 - Rencontre enseignants / élèves (2020-2021)

PHY555 - Energy and Environment (2021-2022)

PHY555 - Energy and environment

Energy is one of the most critical challenges in our societies. Our daily life relies on the availability of large amounts of energy to perform all kind of transformations in all kinds of sectors (industry, transport, residential…). While this wealth of energy has enabled spectacular evolutions since the first industrial revolution, the current model hits physical constraints of the carrying capacity of our planet, as epitomized by resource exhaustion, climate change, and environmental impacts. An energy transition, chosen or not, will take place over the upcoming decades.

The aim of this physics course is to give you an overview of the energy sectors, both from production and consumption perspectives and to show how thermodynamics, and simple physics laws, can be applied to capture the main orders of magnitudes and scaling laws of the problem. A basic knowledge of basic physics, and especially thermodynamics, (undergrad level) is therefore required.

Lecture 1 : Introduction to energy, 1st and 2nd laws, key indicators (primary vs final energy, energy and power density, conversion efficiency, EROI…)

Lecture 2 : Limiting factors, oil peak & climate change

Lecture 3 : Fossile fuels (Oil, gas & coal)

Lecture 4 : Heat engines (motors and turbines)

Lecture 5 : Nuclear energy

Lecture 6 : Solar energy

Lecture 7 : Mechanical energy (wind & hydro), electrical grid stability

Lecture 8 : Heat management, from geothermy to building insulation.

Lecture 9 : Perspectives (hydrogen, batteries, CCS)

 

ECTS Credits :  5

PHY205 - Introduction to Quantum Physics (2021-2022)

Quantum physics is the theoretical framework
for the description of nature at
the atomic length scale and below. According
to our present knowledge, it encompasses
the most fundamental physical
theory, and is the basis for everyday applications
like semi-conductor electrons,
lasers, medical imaging to name only a
few. In PHY205, students discover quantum
physics through the formalism of
Schrödinger’s wave mechanics, and learn
to describe simple, non-relativistic quantum
phenomena, mainly in one dimension,
by applying mathematics of classical
waves to which they have become familiar.
Subsequently, they are introduced to
the quantum-mechanical formalism of
which the central notion is the quantum
state. Students also become familiar with
the underlying mathematical structures,
Hilbert spaces and Hermitian operators,
and discover the quantum description
of known classical systems and concepts
such as free motion, the harmonic oscillator
and angular momentum. The course
also allows students to explore purely
quantum phenomena that have no classical
counterpart, such as the electron
spin, and a brief overview on quantum
communication may be provided. Throughout
the course, the abstract theory will
be illustrated by historic experimental
evidence and modern applications whenever
appropriate.
Upon completion of this course, students
will be able to explain the conceptual
difference between classical and quantum
behavior, and solve simple one- or
two-dimensional problems of quantum
mechanics in the framework of wave
mechanics. Furthermore, they will be
able to wield the abstract formalism of
quantum states in Hilbert spaces, and to
apply it on simple quantum systems.




Quantum physics is the theoretical framework for the description of nature at the atomic length scale and below. According to our present knowledge, it encompasses the most fundamental physical theory, and is the basis for everyday applications like semi-conductor electrons, lasers, medical imaging to name only a few. In PHY 205, students discover quantum physics through the formalism of Schrödinger’s wave mechanics, and learn to describe simple, non-relativistic quantum phenomena, mainly in one dimension, by applying mathematics of classical waves to which they have become familiar. Subsequently, they are introduced to the quantum-mechanical formalism of which the central notion is the quantum state. Students also become familiar with the underlying mathematical structures, Hilbert spaces and Hermitian operators, and discover the quantum description of known classical systems and concepts such as free motion, the harmonic oscillator and angular momentum. The course also allows students to explore purely quantum phenomena that have no classical counterpart, such as the electron spin, and a brief overview on quantum communication may be provided. Throughout the course, the abstract theory will be illustrated by historic experimental evidence and modern applications whenever appropriate.

 Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the conceptual difference between classical and quantum behavior, and solve simple one- or two-dimensional problems of quantum mechanics in the framework of wave mechanics. Furthermore, they will be able to wield the abstract formalism of quantum states in Hilbert spaces, and to apply it on simple quantum systems.

PHY208 - Atoms and Lasers (2021-2022)

Light amplification by stimulated emission
of radiation (laser) holds a unique
place in the heart of physicists. Lasers
are at the same time a spectacular manifestation
of a quantum phenomenon, a
powerful and versatile tool ranging from
industrial applications (laser processing,
telemetry…) to fundamental research
(spectroscopy, cold atoms…) and a
remarkable workbench to acquire a better
understanding of key concepts in physics.
PHY 208 is an introduction to lightmatter
interactions through the intricate
relationship between atoms and lasers.
Importantly, this course will build on
experimental situations, and introduce
models with increasing complexity to
explain the observed results. As the basic
component of a laser is a source of light,
the course will start with basic spectroscopy,
and several atomic models will be
considered (Bohr model, Einstein coefficients,
Schrodinger model, etc.). The
emission of continuous laser light by
such atoms will be described from both
a classical (effective medium) and semiclassical
(population inversion) perspective.
The mirror will then be turned back
on the atoms, and several applications of
laser light revealing the behavior of atoms
will be discussed (Light, Stark and Zeeman
shift, Rabi oscillations etc.). Finally,
some practical perspectives on advanced
laser technologies and applications will be
given.
This course will not add many new physical
concepts, but rather show how results
obtained in previous courses (especially
in optics, classical and quantum mechanics)
can be used. Upon completion of
this course, students will have acquired
key understandings concerning the bilateral
interactions between laser devices
and atoms. They will have understood the
circumstances under which the emission
of useful coherent light can be produced,
and also the information that such light
can provide when analyzing atomic systems.
They will also be able to identify the
relevance, necessity, and limitations that
classical and quantum models display
when analyzing problems in this field.
They will also gain familiarity with some
laser device technologies.




Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) holds a unique place in the heart of physicists. Lasers are at the same time a spectacular manifestation of a quantum phenomenon, a powerful and versatile tool ranging from industrial applications (laser processing, telemetry...) to fundamental research (spectroscopy, cold atoms,...) and a remarkable workbench to acquire a better understanding of key concepts in physics.

 

PHY208 is an introduction to light-matter interactions through the intricate relationship between atoms and lasers. Importantly, this course will build on experimental situations, and introduce models with increasing complexity to explain the observed results. As the basic component of a laser is a source of light, the course will start with basic spectroscopy, and several atomic models will be considered (Bohr model, Einstein coefficients, Schrodinger model, etc.). The emission of continuous laser light by such atoms will be described from both a classical (effective medium) and semi-classical (population inversion) perspective. The mirror will then be turned back on the atoms, and several applications of laser light revealing the behavior of atoms will be discussed (Light, Stark and Zeeman shift, Rabi oscillations etc.). Finally, some practical perspectives on advanced laser technologies and applications will be given.

 

This course will not add many new physical concepts, but rather show how results obtained in previous courses (especially in optics, classical and quantum mechanics) can be used. Upon completion of this course, students will have acquired key understandings concerning the bilateral interactions between laser devices and atoms. They will have understood the circumstances under which the emission of useful coherent light can be produced, and also the information that such light can provide when analyzing atomic systems. They will also be able to identify the relevance, necessity, and limitations that classical and quantum models display when analyzing problems in this field. They will also gain familiarity with some laser device technologies.

PHY612 - Coriolis seminars : Energy research and environment (2021-2022)

Renewable energies S2021/2022

CoursPHY555 - Energy and Environment (2021-2022)

Bilingual Course

The general topic of energy, both at French and worldwide levels, represents some considerable challenge in this beginning of the twenty-first century. We should take up in the next few years a significant number of challenges including the depletion of fossil resources or the consequences of global warming. Understanding concepts related to energy, its most fundamental aspects in its various forms and many uses, becomes essential in the formation of an engineer. The impact on the environment, climate change, the reasonable use of fossil fuels and alternative solutions must be at the heart of its concerns.

This course is largely a about physics and applications. However, it introduces and develops numerous multidisciplinary concepts related to energy such as economy or environment. It will represent an introductory course for students who are considering to study in Masters for careers related to the problems of energy and sustainable development. It will give to other students some comprehensive and rigorous overview of problems, essential to understand our society and its issues.

The course consists of approximately three parts

  1. The energy and its use

Historical context and definitions. First and second principles.
Orders of magnitude and fundamental interactions.
The different forms of energy. Primary and secondary Energy. Efficiencies.
Resource depletions. The peak oil discoveries.
The French and worldwide context.
The climatic consequences. The mechanism of the greenhouse effect.
CO2 emissions and international agreements.

   2.Renewable energy

Different solutions: hydro power, wind power, solar, biomass and others.
Comparison of different type of primary energy in the production of electricity.
Hydrogen as energy vector for the future. The general problem of transport.
The technical, environmental and economic issues.
The recent improvement for the use of fossil fuels.
CO2 storage and other research topics.

  3. Nuclear Energy

Principle of current reactors. The future generation 4.
The fuel cycle and resource depletion.
Problems and solution of waste storage.
The prospects of fusion for the production of electricity
The Tchernobyl, Fukushima and Three Mile Island accidents.

Credits ECTS : 5




Bilingual Course

The general topic of energy, both at French and worldwide levels, represents some considerable challenge in this beginning of the twenty-first century. We should take up in the next few years a significant number of challenges including the depletion of fossil resources or the consequences of global warming. Understanding concepts related to energy, its most fundamental aspects in its various forms and many uses, becomes essential in the formation of an engineer. The impact on the environment, climate change, the reasonable use of fossil fuels and alternative solutions must be at the heart of its concerns.

This course is largely a about physics and applications. However, it introduces and develops numerous multidisciplinary concepts related to energy such as economy or environment. It will represent an introductory course for students who are considering to study in Masters for careers related to the problems of energy and sustainable development. It will give to other students some comprehensive and rigorous overview of problems, essential to understand our society and its issues.

The course consists of approximately three parts

  1. The energy and its use

Historical context and definitions. First and second principles.
Orders of magnitude and fundamental interactions.
The different forms of energy. Primary and secondary Energy. Efficiencies.
Resource depletions. The peak oil discoveries.
The French and worldwide context.
The climatic consequences. The mechanism of the greenhouse effect.
CO2 emissions and international agreements.

   2.Renewable energy

Different solutions: hydro power, wind power, solar, biomass and others.
Comparison of different type of primary energy in the production of electricity.
Hydrogen as energy vector for the future. The general problem of transport.
The technical, environmental and economic issues.
The recent improvement for the use of fossil fuels.
CO2 storage and other research topics.

  3. Nuclear Energy

Principle of current reactors. The future generation 4.
The fuel cycle and resource depletion.
Problems and solution of waste storage.
The prospects of fusion for the production of electricity
The Tchernobyl, Fukushima and Three Mile Island accidents.

Credits ECTS : 5

CoursPHY657 - Building and Using Models for the Energy Transition (2021-2022)

Models are everywhere, and especially when it comes to the energy and climate transitions. They provide a rationale for decision making, and constitute the standard way to test and improve our understanding. Yet, what a “model” is can be very different from one actor to another. Furthermore, models should be used with methodological care: any model is developed to address specific questions, in a specific validity range, with specific assumptions. However, while the output and conclusions of the models are often readily used and debated, the methodology and the validity of hypothesis and results are not often enough closely scrutinized.


As scientists involved in the energy and climate transitions, you will have to deal with many different models – whether you developed them yourselves or simply use their results. The aim of this course is to provide you with a critical methodology based on a physicist’s toolbox to help you use these models as wisely as possible.

As a note of caution : this is not a course in applied mathematics : efficient programming is important, as is a careful choice of algorithms, but this comes after the general framework is chosen and the direction set.  Nor is it a course on big data analysis. An efficient algorithm can produce irrelevant or wrong data, and using up to date data analysis tool will not help to produce sensible conclusions.

The first lectures will introduce basic concepts of modelling (modeling vs simulation, prediction vs prospection…) as well as a set of physics methods relevant to the field (perturbative approach, scaling laws...). Following lectures will be presented by experts in the transition sector who will share their own experience of modelling. Students will select a case study they will investigate throughout the course, building their own model to compare and test against the existing literature.

PHY530 - Refresher Course in Physics (2021-2022)

PHY657 - Building and Using Models for the Energy Transition (2021-2022)

Models are everywhere, and especially when it comes to the energy and climate transitions. They provide a rationale for decision making, and constitute the standard way to test and improve our understanding. Yet, what a “model” is can be very different from one actor to another. Furthermore, models should be used with methodological care: any model is developed to address specific questions, in a specific validity range, with specific assumptions. However, while the output and conclusions of the models are often readily used and debated, the methodology and the validity of hypothesis and results are not often enough closely scrutinized.


As scientists involved in the energy and climate transitions, you will have to deal with many different models – whether you developed them yourselves or simply use their results. The aim of this course is to provide you with a critical methodology based on a physicist’s toolbox to help you use these models as wisely as possible.

As a note of caution : this is not a course in applied mathematics : efficient programming is important, as is a careful choice of algorithms, but this comes after the general framework is chosen and the direction set.  Nor is it a course on big data analysis. An efficient algorithm can produce irrelevant or wrong data, and using up to date data analysis tool will not help to produce sensible conclusions.

The first lectures will introduce basic concepts of modelling (modeling vs simulation, prediction vs prospection…) as well as a set of physics methods relevant to the field (perturbative approach, scaling laws...). Following lectures will be presented by experts in the transition sector who will share their own experience of modelling. Students will select a case study they will investigate throughout the course, building their own model to compare and test against the existing literature.

GEN507 - Présentation du PA Energies du XXI° siècle (2021-2022)