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[VIDEO] Neutrino, Nobel Prize in physics in 2015

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 was awarded to two scientists for having revealed the neutrino oscillation. The discovery was conducted in Japan and confirmed by the "T2K"experiment that involved researchers of the Leprince - Ringuet Laboratory (École Polytechnique / CNRS).

Takaaki Kajita (Japan) and Arthur B. McDonald (Canada) received the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics for having highlighted the neutrino natural oscillation phenomenon, an elementary particle of matter that appears in nuclear reactions and radioactivity phenomena.

This discovery was confirmed in 2011 in Japan with the highlighting of the mechanism of appearance in "T2K" experience (Tokaï to Kamioka) held with participation of the researchers of the Leprince-Ringuet Laboratory (École Polytechnique / CNRS).
This experiment allowed the first direct observation of the transformation of "muon" neutrinos in "electron" neutrinos.

Olivier Drapier, a researcher at the Leprince-Ringuet Laboratory, participated in the first direct observation of the transformation of neutrinos from one type to another via international experience T2K. He explains the mysteries of this elementary particle in this Labshot.

Olivier Drapier is a CNRS researcher at the Leprince-Ringuet Laboratory (LLR, joint research unit of CNRS and École Polytechnique). He studied neutrinos through the international experiment T2K (Tokaï to Kamioka) in Japan. He has also participated in the first direct observation of the transformation of neutrinos from one type to another. The French teams of this experiment received an award from the French scientific magazine "La Recherche" for this discovery in 2012. Olivier Drapier is a member of the new international collaboration JUNO (Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory). JUNO aims at building a gigantic underground neutrino detector containing twenty thousand tons of liquid scintillator in the South of China. This device will detect antineutrinos from two nuclear power plants located fifty kilometers away in order to study the mass of different types of neutrinos.